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Students' art showcased at Airdrie library

By: Chelsie Dowler

  |  Posted: Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 04:08 pm

Katie Schulze, a Grade 10 student at George McDougall High School, poses with her art that was inspired by a dream, which is one of the pieces on display at the Airdrie Public Library's "Primary Colours" exhibit March 5 to May 7.
Katie Schulze, a Grade 10 student at George McDougall High School, poses with her art that was inspired by a dream, which is one of the pieces on display at the Airdrie Public Library's "Primary Colours" exhibit March 5 to May 7.
Chelsie Dowler/Rocky View Publishing

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Artwork by students from Bert Church, George McDougall and St. Martin de Porres high schools is currently in the spotlight, during the Airdrie Public Library’s “Primary Colours” exhibit.Katie Schulze, a Grade 10 student at George McDougall High School, poses with her art that was inspired by a dream, which is one of the pieces on display at the Airdrie Public Library's "Primary Colours" exhibit March 5 to May 7.

Katie Schulze, a Grade 10 student at George McDougall High School, poses with her art that was inspired by a dream, which is one of the pieces on display at the Airdrie Public Library's "Primary Colours" exhibit March 5 to May 7.
Chelsie Dowler/Rocky View Publishing
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The showcase began March 5 and will continue until May 7.

More than 80 people, including the Rocky View Schools’ Youth Choir, entertained the attendees of the premiere, March 3, showcasing 50 drawings and paintings created by high school students in Airdrie.

“When my art teacher (Marda Wright) came up to me and said she put my artwork up in this art show I was really surprised,” said Katie Schulze of George McDougall High School.

“I was expecting it to be something I would just put up in my room.”

The colourful, detailed drawing (#37 on display) of a bistro in the Mediterranean was created by the Grade 10 student using Crayola pencil crayons. It took more than 20 hours to complete.

Schulze hasn’t always wanted to be an artist, but she took some words of wisdom from the evening’s guest speaker, Ken Vickets.

“Whatever you plan to do for a living, keep in mind that if you like what you do, you don’t ever have to go to work because it’s not work when you go,” said Vickets, a local artist and president of the Airdrie Regional ARTS Society.

Lisa Tschritter, the art teacher at Bert Church High School, said art is important in schools because it gives students a creative outlet and a way to communicate without words.

It opens up opportunities for some students to explore, and for other students it’s a safe haven where they can go, where they feel like they belong.

“Not everyone is academic, so it’s about inclusion - Inclusive education allowing different options,” said Tschritter.

Linda Bruce, director of Creative Airdrie; Ron Chapman, City of Airdrie alderman and Paul Schulz, Airdrie City manager came out to support the Airdrie artists.

While admiring the artists’ ability, Chapman questioned the deeper root of a few of the works of art, like the skateboard broken in half with a paintings on each half, the drawing of Leonardo DiCaprio and the charcoal drawing of Johnny Cash.

“That drawing (Johnny Cash) is amazing,” said Chapman.

“It’s really great… especially for the kids to get the support of the people who make decisions and help things to change and get better in the community,” said Veronica Funk, Airdrie Public Library art program coordinator.

Funk looks forward to seeing the art that will be displayed at next years Art Gala and hopes to get more high schools on board.


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