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Documentary rolls through Airdrie with vintage cars in tow

By: Monique Massiah

  |  Posted: Thursday, Aug 21, 2014 12:28 pm

Monique Massiah/Airdrie City View

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Imagine crossing the province in an antique car, driving down dirt roads, kicking up dust and cutting through fields like they did more than 100 years ago. A new City TV documentary on the 100-mile road between Calgary and Edmonton is being filmed over three days this week and made a stop at Airdrie’s Nose Creek Valley Museum on Aug. 18.

The film, The 100 Milie Road, will take car enthusiasts on the original roads and trails taken from Calgary to Edmonton using antique vehicles.

Airdrie residents Walter Bushfeild and Orest Kitzul, met with friends taking part in the documentary at the museum and got to show off their antique Overland and Callidac cars, which will also be featured in the documentary.

Bushfield’s Overland took about two years to restore. It was originally purchased from a vendor in Calgary where it was warehoused. The farmer has now completed 10 car restorations.

“When I bought the thing they had taken the axels off of it and made a lumber wagon out of it in B.C. in a lumber mill,” he said.

Kitzul showed his 1911 Cadillac, and said though a vendor in Vancouver originally restored his vehicle, Kitzul has since replaced the wheels and top of the vehicle.

The concept for the tour originated with Edmontonians Pat McKenna and Ray Fowler.

“We thought that was a great story and we wanted to tell it,” said Jeff Woodward, City TV producer.

Nose Creek Valley Museum summer student Nicole Proseilo was also interviewed for the film.

“It’s pretty cool because I have never been in a documentary,” she said. “I was nervous but the gentleman was very nice. They asked me about the area and the history and significance of the hotel in Airdrie.”

“We talked about if they had came here about 100 years ago,” she said. “The hotel here on Main Street started out as a stopping house on a farm and then eventually became a hotel where people would come to stay.”

The documentary will air on Sept. 26 in Calgary and Edmonton on City TV. The entire journey will take about three and a half days to complete, said Woodward.

The trip took the car enthusiasts from Calgary to Carstairs on Aug. 18, from there onto Red Deer on Aug. 19 and from Red Deer to Leduc on Aug. 20, finishing up in Edmonton on Aug. 21.

“There were no paved roads (100 years ago), even in Calgary there were a couple cobble stone roads maybe, but there was no asphalt, these cars were made for dirt roads,” said Woodward.

“The very first road guide was published by the Calgary Auto Club in 1914. This is the centennial of that publication.”

The first road maps were more like guides with a series of directions, he said.

“It’s very much like a book of directions because there wasn’t a highway it was a series of directions, roads of trails and tracks and sometimes you were going through a farmer’s field.”

It’s been a great experience, said Woodward, except for a few mishaps like a burst tire on the first day. Imagine crossing the province in an antique car, driving down dirt roads, kicking up dust and cutting through fields like they did more than 100 years ago. A new City TV documentary on the 100-mile road between Calgary and Edmonton is being filmed over three days this week and made a stop at Airdrie’s Nose Creek Valley Museum on Aug. 18.

The film will take car enthusiasts on some of the original roads and trails taken from Calgary to Edmonton using antique vehicles.

Airdrie residents Walter Bushfeild and Orest Kitzul, met with friends taking part in the documentary at the museum and got to show off their antique Overland and Callidac cars, which will also be featured in the documentary.

Bushfield’s Overland took about two years to restore. It was originally purchased from a vendor in Calgary where it was warehoused. The farmer has now completed 10 car restorations.

“When I bought the thing they had taken the axels off of it and made a lumber wagon out of it in B.C. in a lumber mill,” he said.

Kitzul showed his 1911 Cadillac, and said though a vendor in Vancouver originally restored his vehicle, Kitzul has since replaced the wheels and top of the vehicle.

The concept for the tour originated with Pat McKenna and Ray Fowler.

“We thought that was a great story and we wanted to tell it,” said Jeff Woodward, City TV producer.

Nose Creek Valley Museum summer student Nicole Proseilo was also interviewed for the film.

“It’s pretty cool because I have never been in a documentary,” she said. “I was nervous but the gentleman was very nice. They asked me about the area and the history and significance of the hotel in Airdrie.”

“We talked about if they had came here about 100 years ago,” she said. “The hotel here was on Main Street it started out as a stopping house on a farm and then eventually became a hotel where people would come to stay.”

The documentary will air on Sept. 26 in Calgary and Edmonton on City TV. The entire journey will take about three and a half days to complete, said Woodward.

The trip took the car enthusiasts from Calgary to Carstairs on Aug. 18, from there onto Red Deer on Aug. 19 and from Red Deer to Leduc on Aug. 20, finishing up in Edmonton on Aug. 21.

“There were no paved roads (100 years ago), even in Calgary there were a couple cobble stone roads maybe, but there was no asphalt, these cars were made for dirt roads,” said Woodward. “The very first road guide was published by the Calgary Auto Club in 1914. This is the centennial of that publication.”

The first road maps were more like guides with a series of directions, he said.

“It’s very much like a book of directions because there wasn’t a highway it was a series of directions, roads of trails and tracks and sometimes you were going through a farmer’s field.”

It’s been a great experience, said Woodward, but for a few mishaps like a burst tire on the first day.


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